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his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
at madison park high school when mandela arrived. >> mr. nelson mandela. [ cheers ] >> reporter: inside the school, pure excitement. >> you all have filled our hearts. >> reporter: this man was a student there. >> 23 years later i still remember that day as if it were yesterday. you heard about this guy in history and suddenly, you know, he's coming to your high school. it was a surreal moment. >> reporter: in detroit -- ♪ >> reporter: -- tens of thousands flocked to tiger stadium. owen beaver was in the motor city. >> i met him for the first time. i got to tell you, we embraced. >> reporter: it was a whirlwind trip. 8 cities, 12 days. stops in miami, los angeles, washington, d.c., and atlanta. >> to be so young and to meet a leader as great as mandela was a really big moment. >> reporter: this woman was just 10 years old at the time, on the tarmac in atlanta. >> i just remember looking in his face. even as young as i was, i remember thinking just what a kindness there was about him and his eyes thinking how amazing it was for somebody who had been through so much to not have a harden
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged from behind bars without bitterness, to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> melson mandela sacrificed his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: his work was recognized with a nobel peace prize. as south africa's first black president, mandela remained a humble man. taking delight in a new york tickertape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas.
, president reagan and u.s. policy was pro-white south africa and really, mr. mandela was on the terrorist list until july 1st, 2008, taken off by president george bush. until 2008 he was still on the terrorist list. >> he said some things that were very controversial. in 2002, mandela said as the debate about the war in iraq was beginning but before the war had launched, he said quote, if there's a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world it is the united states of america. they don't care for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948.
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
, mr. mandela." he said "the name is nelson. welcome." so we became friends. >> reporter: for 18 of the 27 years he s:e mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of this walk there was no freedom, there was this. an eight foot square cell with a mattress on the floor for his bed and a bucket for a toilet. mandela was allowed one visitor a year for half an hour. mandela and daniels were among 30 political prisoners isolated in what was simply called "b" block. >> we sat on the brick. >> reporter: mandela and his fellow inmates worked long days in the yard sitting on bricks ordered only to look straight ahead they smashed slate into gravel with hammers. black inmates wore short pants in all weather. the apartheid regime's way of reminding them that all black men were considered boys no matter what their age. the yard is now just another stop on the robben island tourist route. but no visitor can imagine what it meant to eddie daniels when his jailors allowed the "b" block prisoners in the yard one night after six years being locked in by sun set. >> i looked up and
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
, this was not entirely unexpected news, given mr. mandela's health. how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: mara this was predictable news but painful none theless, announced late at night just before midnight south african time. many millions of south africans are still waking up to learn the news the father of this nation passed away during yesterday evening. first the mood here at nelson mandela's suburban home was fairly somber. now it is incredibly cell la braer to. people are bringing flowers, cheering, singing songs from the anti-apartheid struggle. they're celebrating his life and celebrating the lives they can now lead as a result of his anti-apartheid struggle. many people wondering here precisely what will happen next? what will the state event be. they're waiting for details about a lying in state which is expected in the next few days and about a burial which one american diplomat described as being the biggest state burial in the world since that of winston churhill. >> celebration of a remarkable life, rohit kachroo, thank you for that. >>> in so many ways nelson mandela is known
early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela over time after he came out of jail became iconic and president of the country. >> he was particularly meaningful if your country. in your mom's kitchen there are family pictures or there had been family pictures and the only non-family member in that photograph was nelson mandela. >> when the amc won, my mom went to a party in south africa and he pulled her up on the stage and you see them dancing. great picture. >> all right. remembering nelson mandela. again, a week long celebration of his life beginning next week. >>> all right. all of a sudden the white house has a new version of a meeting between the president and his controversial uncle. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. it really made the difference between a morning around the house and getting a little exercise. unlike the bargain brand, depend gives you new fit-flex®, our best protection. it's a smooth and comfortable fit with more lycra strands. get your free sample at depend.com. t
want to show you something before we go. within minutes of mr. mandela's death, a few flowers were placed outside his home. look at it now. in the days to come, there will be more. >> that is for sure. byron pitts tonight. thank you. >>> and some dramatic pictures coming in from overseas, from ukraine. hundreds of thousands of people filling the central square there in the capital. angry that their president is now forging closer ties with russia and moving away from the west. a landmark statue of vladimir lenin was toppled over. people taking turns taking aim. >>> and from iran tonight, state tv is reporting that u.n. inspectors have begun their work. it comes after that landmark short-term nuclear agreement. this weekend in washington, meantime, president obama giving the odds of achieving a long-term agreement with iran 50/50 at best. >>> meantime, the pentagon under fire tonight for its decision to buy combat helicopters made in russia. lawmakers on both sides, asking, why not made in america? here tonight, abc's aditi roy. >> reporter: tonight, new questions arise as to why th
in his hometown in the eastern cape province of south africa. a distant part of this country where mr. mandela was born and where he grew up as a young boy. so several events still for many days packed with a lot of emotion as the country and world say good-bye and farewell and pay tribute to nelson mandela. now back to you. >>> breaking news just coming into our newsroom. an after-school worker at a bay area catholic school is under arrest, accused of having a sexual relationship with a student. police in hayward say 29-year-old mia cummings and the 14-year-old victim have had an inappropriate relationship for two years. cummings is an after-school program assistant at all saints catholic school. she is facing eight felony counts of lewd acts with a child. police do not believe cummings victimized any other children. >>> still to come, first the sales now the holiday shipping crunch. but how do you make sure your packages are safe? the answer is coming up in a live report. >>> a coalition of high-tech companies take on government spying. we'll take a look coming up in business and te
. every day here in south africa, until mr. mandela is finally laid to rest. >> a man who changed the world. >>> our ron claiborne has covered nelson mandela extensively throughout the years. >> ron has had many experiences and memories. and is here with a personal take on the story. >> when you cover a story or a person, it requires professional detachment. we're supposed to stand back, observe and report. for nelson mandela, it was difficult for me personally, because something kept getting in the way. the fact that i admired the man deeply. the first time i saw nelson mandela was at yankee stadium in 1990. six months after he had been released from prison. i was in awe, probably we all were. but then he did something that charmed all of us. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee. >> reporter: as a college student, i read about this man serving a life sentence for fighting against apartheid. i was fired up by the slogan, free mandela. years later, at abc, i traveled to south africa to embezzle his birthplace and qunu, where he you up as a small child. and where he will be burie
life of. >> robert makes a very important point. yet politics has not been absent in the days since mr. mandela's passing, kate. i think what had happened in some corners of the conservative blogosphere, twittersphere -- i'm not from the 20th century. please don't ask me to use these words. on his facebook page commenters, including this person who couldn't spend his name called him a commune nist involved in torture, terror, murder and they have lost a lot of respect for senator cruz. it's amazing to me the vitriol that exists in parts of american society. people like nelson mandela who should be a hero for everybody the world over and especially here in the united states. >> he was a political person so people are going to have political feelings about him. kudos to senator cruz for what's being said on his facebook and going. he obviously wanted to go. >> which is less about nelson mandela and more about ted cruz. jonathan, in fairness if we're talking about conservatives who are quote, unquote, doing the right thing, newt gingrich called nelson mandela one of the greatest leaders o
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
are under way following mandela's death thursday night. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared now for his lying in state. that will happen late they are week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service, then there will be a state funeral on sunday in the village where he grew up. >>> number four, mexican police have recovered stolen radioactive material and are grilling six men who may be connected to the theft. the men tested negative for any poisoning from that material. they're now in police custody. mexican authorities say they've recovered all of the lost cobalt-60 material, but they've been tight-lipped about whether they've made any arrests in the broader case. >>> services will be held today in hawaii to mark the 72nd anniversary of the japanese attack on pearl harbor. lots of veterans and survivors are angry that the traditional missing-man flyover, you saw one there, has been cancelled this year. because of military budget constraints. >>> blockbuster jobs report for november. >> yeah. >> and it could not have come at a better time really for pre
to be with you. >> we see just in the live shot from there, people are celebrating mr. mandela's life and the impact that he made on all of us, but you're looking at the sheer number of people. there's no reason for us to expect there would be any violence, keeping the area secure with 95,000 people half the world leaders in this open air stadium is an incredible sikt as ron pointed out. >> it's an extremely complex undertaking. close to 100 heads of state and government attending and each of those leaders comes a delegat n delegation -- as he alluded to with regards to the stadium, obviously, security concerns that the south african and other security officials will be forced to deal with. >> politico is reporting shortly after the announcement on thursday that nelson mandela passed away, secret service and american military personnel were en route to prepare for president obama's arrival here. what would you compare this to in events that you worked on? the first thing for me that came in mind watching the pope in south america earlier this year, wherefore whatever reason the motor
of the united states,. the photograph was taken when mandela visited washington in 2005. and mr. obama was then a brand-new united states senator from illinois. here was mr. obama's reaction late today to the death. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. >> pelley: president obama used the word modiba an honorary tightle that translates at father. major garrett at the white house tells us this evening mr. obama plans to attend the state funeral in south africa. that is likely to be in about ten days. nelson mandela will be remembered as a man who emerged from a tiny village to become a defining figure of our time. he was born on july 18th, 1918 in a village called mvezo. his mother named him holy sashava meaning troublemaker, but later a teacher renamed him nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 2
overlapped. when mr. clinton got caught up in scandal mandela visiting the white house stood by him saying our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. recently we asked mr. clinton about their special bond. >> you met with nelson mandela more than any president. and i wonder what was your relationship in those days? >> well, we became good friends. i met him, ironically in 1992 i met him at the democratic convention in new york when i was being nominated for president. we had business to do. they were one of the countries that voluntarily gave up their nuclear arsenal. and in the process of that we became good personal friends. we used to do business together on the phone where their time difference was so great i would take the call at night. and it wasn't too late mandela would make me go get chelsea every time he called and he would talk to her and ask her if she was doing her homework. he was an enormous help to me during every difficult time i had as president. and he did it all, interestingly enough while he never stopped being president of south africa. so if his country h
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
, there is a response from his office, which is mr. mandela deserves to be remembered and honored for his sacrifices in pursuit of freedom, for the oppressed and his historic achievements to that end. that's from a spokeswoman, ka katherine frazier. he's aware there has been a negative response from some conservatives. he got similar not as negative, but some negative response when he supported the gillibrand amendment that had to do with sexual assault in the military, a complicated bill we can talk about at another time, but he also got brush back from conservatives on that. >> we'll watch you tackle this and other stories coming up in five minutes. i'll let you go. jake tapper on "the lead." thank you very much. >>> have you seen this video? i know you're all tweeting what happens to the video. we will tell you, next. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo,
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
, president obama will be among the mourners along with mrs. obama who met mandela shortly after becoming first lady. president bush and laura bush have been invited to travel with the obamas, and former president clinton and hillary clinton will travel to the tribute for nelson mandela. from south africa we hear from one of his friends who described those final visits with the man he revered. abc's byron pitts from outside mandela's home. >> reporter: nowhere has admiration for nelson mandela been stronger, expressed more passionately than a few feet from his doorstep outside his home where the beloved statesman took his last breath. >> by singing and dancing, it's a way of showing our appreciation. >> he represents this country. >> reporter: nelson mandela will be laid to rest in grand style. tuesday, a memorial service like the world has never seen. some 95,000 people packed inside the stadium. wednesday through friday the former president will lay in state in pretoria, the nation's legislative capital. next sunday mandela will be laid to rest in the small village of his boyhood on the
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
and mrs. bush. >>> another former president is remembering mandela today. president bill clinton, who talked with the anchor of this week, george stephanopoulos. >> he once told me that he lived on hatred, when he went into prison. he said after 11 years he realized that they had taken about everything they could take from him except his mind and heart. he said, i realized that those are things you have to give away, and i decided not to give them away. >> mahatma gandhi, abe lincoln, george washington. he belongs in that group. >> he does. you know, in my lifetime, gandhi and mandela, in no small measure, because of their willingness to give up the comforts of ordinary life, they symbolize the world we'd all like to live in, if we could just be a little bigger, if we could be a little more like them. >> president clinton with george stephanopoulos, president clinton once asked mandela if he still hated his oppressors, mandela answered, nope, they had me 27 years in prison, if i hated them when i walked out the door, they would still have me. >>> and now, we turn next to what was a bi
will leave it there. thanks for coming in. >> thank you. >> up next, remembering nelson mandela, the president and mrs. obama are on the way to south africa right now for what is becoming a massive memorial, perhaps the largest in world history. heads of state will be gagering to pay respects. it will be a security nightmare for agents around the world. >> cans on across the country thanks to a wintry mix. we will have none other than jim cantore who will be live from the snowy northeast. a look ahead at the politics planner. >> it will bed bidens for them for a holiday celebration. you are watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the third was... just right! bear: hi! yeah, we love visitors. that's why we moved to a secluded house in the middle of the wilderness. just the right coverage at just the right price. coverage checker from progressive. you may be muddling throu
moments with us tonight. thank you so much. >> i thank you very much, mr. anderson cooper. thank you, god bless you. >> how awesome is she? much has been made of nelson mandela's talent. the 1995 rugby world cup, remarkable, mandela wearing the uniform of a team adored by white africaners as a symbol of apartheid. that resinated on and off the playing field. or in gary players case, the golf course. he was moved by mandela and a 1966 sports illustrated profile john under wood says he feels critics are not aware how the black natives of south africa are. there are growing children who will some day be ready for the responsibility of adulthood but in the meantime must be given guidance in christian compassion. the same year the player writes he lives in a country which is quote the product of its instinct and ability to maintain civilized values and standards amongst the alien bar barrens. the gary player today is not the gary player of 1966. we spoke earlier. >>> gary, you tell a remarkable story about the first time you met nelson mandela after he was released from prison. explain what h
. but the unionists would not sit in the same room with the representatives even though it was nelson mandela, and it fell to me to go to him when he landed in his helicopter to say, mr. president, i'm afraid you'll have to experience a little bit of apartheid here. the outcome was very important. when he talked to the ira, he told them that if they wanted to get in to the peace process in a serious way they would have to declare a permanent cease-fire and to commit themselves to the non-use of violence. telling them this is what you must do. an all these years if you have used violence. the time has come to stop. then when he went to the unionist parties, he had a different message. he said to them because he had been very well briefed, he said to them, you have two conditions you want the irasi sinn fein to agree to. one to cease violence and to-- >> i have to interrupt. i have been lulled into this story, and i have totally lost track of my time. and i have run out of time. i can't thank you enough for being on the program. you have told a fascinating story in a really compelling way. i ap
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
's national day of brprayer kicks off a week-long semibrags. mandela made his last public appearance at the 2010 world cup. president obama and the first lady will be there, along with former president george w. bush and mrs. bush. former president jimmy carter. and former president bill clinton and mrs. clinton are expected at the funeral on sunday. next sunday, the state funeral in his hometown on the eastern cape. his long-time friend and lawyer, george bizos. >> he will go down in history, i think, as the revolutionary who didn't believe in violence. >> reporter: earlier today, we had our first public sighting of winnie mandela, his former wife and partner. today will be quiet. on tuesday, the gatheri ining l the world has never seen before, as dignitaries from around the globe gather to say farewell. >> nelson mandela has a large and complicated family tree with over a dozen grandchildren. some of them opened up to reena ninan on a recent visit to south africa. she's here to tell us about it. >> reporter: 17 grandkids and three wives. everyone vying for his time and affection. t
to go before reaching the south pole. >>> president obama and mrs. obama left washington a short time ago. on "face the nation" yesterday bob schieffer focused mandela's life. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> i loved the show how you started with maya angelou and ended with the poem she had written for him because it so brilliantly captured his life and what it meant. >> she is an amazing person in her own right. >> i think so too. >> when i called her last week and asked her to be on i thought -- she's not in the best of health. she can't travel very much and she said, no i'll do it because i want to. and then i found autoout she had written this poem. she didn't tell us. she told us on the show when the state department asked her to do this not to disclose it for -- until 48 hours after he was dead. >> how did you get gayle king to do it? >> you know that was an e-mail from bob schieffer to gayle king. yeah. what they're saying in south africa, though today about him while they're grieving, of course they're also celebrating. i saw one woman wh
the warmth of mr. obama's performance. he looks good. >> welcome to "cbs this morning saturday," i'm anthony mason. >> and i'm venita meyer. >>> the lighting of the christmas tree became the celebration of the life of nelson mandela. >> senior white house correspondent bill plant joins us with more on that. >> reporter: good morning, well washington has temporarily put aside its usual battles over health care and the budget to pay tribute to nelson mandela. but as you mentioned, there was one annual presidential tradition yesterday, which did not go unobserved. >> three, two, one -- [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: president obama joined by his family pushed the button to bathe the national christmas tree in a warm holiday glow. and later remembered the man he says has been a major inspiration. >> and this year we give a special measure of gratitude for nelson mandela a man who championed that generosity of spirit. in his life he blessed us with tremendous grace and unbelievable courage. and we are all privileged to live in a world touched by his goodne
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